THE ,,1887 VOYAGE OF JOHN JOSEPH LACE

One man especially, a saloon passenger by name Matoon who was
so dejected, sad and o1d a week ago is now around quite chatty and sociable. He has rather a g.1qomydejected disposition at
any time I shou~q judge, bu,t sickness made him appear doubly so.

          He has a young son with him of maybe 18 years who has the oldest face for a young man I ever seen.  The face is one befitting a man of 50 not a boy ,of 18. All it needs is the wrinkles of age to make his as old looking as his father. Some of our men are inclined to indulge too freely in the use of the ardent and I thank my stars often that I am a teetotaler
and have a mind enough to stick to it. A great many of them think they cannot have a good time without a show of something stimulating and they even call on Bass ale and stout at their dinners, thinking I suppose that it makes them appear smart
and "jolly good fellows". Certainly it's not for an appetite for we all eat hearty. Two steamers have been visible today
to us passengers and one we could not see but heard about it being aft on the starboard side. Our sick man Abbott is today on deck and seems all better. Everyone seems in good courage and reckoning how long before we reach Queenstown. We are now on the last 1000 miles and that makes more hopeful minds.

Wednesday July 1,1887

          I arose quite early this morning and was on deck enjoying the sweet morninq air. The color oŁ the water is much lighter than heretofore today showing that the land is near. The sailors say it is mixed with sand giving it the light color. While
in mid-ocean the color was much darker being a deep bluish green and very pure color.

          While sitting on the deck last evening I could not help but think of the long evenings. It was long 3.fter nine o'clock before it was dark. Again it is daylight earlier than at home. These many little things remind me very much of my childhood days.

          In the afternoon the steamer Penitame of the White star Line went westward coming within a short distance of us, with whom we exchanged signals. It was the nearest any vessel has come to us since leaving the lightship at Boston. She left Liverpool on Wednesday last, the 29th and is therefore about
2 days out.

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